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Neuron Behavior

Kaitlin Cough, Elizabeth Harnett

Our hypothesis was that reaction time would be slower if you were distracted, and it did not matter how far the stimulus was from the brain: it would still react at the same time. We did four different experiments testing neuron behavior. Kaitlin and Elizabeth were both tested. Constant: we always poked on the hand, with exception of the foot trial.

Experiment 1: Poking the hand without any distraction.

Elizabeth

 

t1

t2

t3

ND

MD

RT

 

1.106

1.233

1.278

0.127

0.045

0.172

 

1.955

2.103

2.151

0.148

0.048

0.196

 

2.812

2.913

2.964

0.101

0.051

0.152

 

Kaitlin

 

t1

t2

t3

ND

MD

RT

4.37

4.508

4.561

0.138

0.053

0.191

6.494

6.6

6.65

0.138

0.05

0.188

10.214

10.34

10.392

0.126

0.052

0.178

Experiment 2: Poking on the foot without distraction.

Elizabeth

2.467

2.661

2.708

0.194

0.047

0.241

4.04

4.167

4.199

0.127

0.032

0.159

7.301

7.459

7.501

0.158

0.042

0.2

Kaitlin

 

6.982

7.114

7.156

0.132

0.042

0.174

8.931

8.995

9.092

0.064

0.097

0.161

13.418

13.573

13.636

0.155

0.063

0.218

Experiment 3: Poking on the hand while talking on the phone.

Elizabeth

 

1.005

1.224

1.289

0.219

0.065

0.284

19.684

20.073

20.121

0.389

0.048

0.437

27.064

27.374

27.408

0.31

0.034

0.344

Kaitlin

 

15.281

15.532

15.592

0.251

0.06

0.311

16.794

16.97

17.051

0.176

0.081

0.257

20.596

20.842

20.902

0.246

0.06

0.306

 

Experiment 4: Poking on the hand while reading.

Elizabeth

10.874

11.19

11.247

0.316

0.057

0.373

26.534

26.817

26.854

0.283

0.037

0.32

39.302

39.518

39.575

0.216

0.057

0.273

Kaitlin

10.865

10.956

10.996

0.091

0.04

0.131

13.912

13.993

14.058

0.081

0.065

0.146

7.462

7.627

7.684

0.165

0.057

0.22

 

We discovered that our first hypothesis was correct: if you were distracted, then the reaction time was much longer. This could especially be seen while we were talking on the phone. However, our second hypothesis was slightly disproven. We found that distance from the brain did have an effect on reaction time, even though the reaction time was not as slow as when we were distracted.

Our story: Don't talk on your cell phone when your driving!

Distance from the brain has a slight effect on reaction time, though nothing as drastic as distractions (reading, talking, etc.) Maybe a next step could have been to test the effect of music on reaction time, because usually when you are driving you are listening to music.

 

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