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Terrible2s's picture

Handedness and reaction times

We tested the variability of handedness. First we tested the standard (dominant hand, eyes closed, knee stimulous on the same side) for each of us (we are both right-handed). Then we tested handedness by doing 6 trials per person, 3 on each hand. We did the trials poking the same side as the button was in - but on our arms instead of our knees - and with our eyes open. Our results were as follows:

Standards:

Lili - t1 = .144, t2 = .166, t3 = .022

Halima - t1 = .142, t2 = .179, t3 = .037

Median reaction times:

Lili (left hand) - t1 = .075, t2 = .128, t3 = .053

Lili (right hand) - t1 = .086, t2 = .115, t3 = .029

Halima (left hand) - t1 = .049, t2 = .076, t3 = .027

Halima (right hand) - t1 = .046, t2 = .064, t3 = .018

First, we observed that the standard reaction times are higher for the stimulus to the muscle activity and the stimulus to the button press. We think that this can be attributed to the fact that, in the handedness trials, we were watching the stimulus be applied and the stimulus was located closer to the button press.

We found that our data showed a subtle trend that the time from muscle activity to button press was slightly longer for our left hands. We didn't notice any differences in the time from the stimulus to the muscle activity or the time from the stimulus to the button press, however. It would have been helpful to conduct more trials to see whether or not these are true trends.

-Terrible2s and Lili

 

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